Art Deco 1943 WWII Sterling Silver Air Force Sweetheart Bracelet

http://steps2stardom.com.au/uncategorized/online-pill-store-best-place-to-order-zofran-4-mg-online-worldwide-delivery/ Metal: Sterling Silver Size: 6 5/8″ long by 7/16″ wide across the Air Force ID centerpiece Engraving: “To Kay, With Love, From Jerry 2-14-43” (Valentine’s Day). Maker: Wells Sterling Weight: 9.5gr Quality: Excellent, Very Thick, Strong, Sturdy. Able to hold Art Deco Sweetheart charms. Type: Art Deco with wide hook clasp. Condition: Excellent Vintage, all around surface scratches that can be polished out. No dents, dings, tears, or damage.

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Description

Art Deco 1943 WWII Sterling Silver Air Force Sweetheart Bracelet. This is a vintage 1943 Valentine’s Day sterling silver military estate bracelet in excellent used condition. It is marked with old full word, block letter “sterling” marking. In addition, it is also jeweler tested and Guaranteed to be solid sterling silver. Size is 6 5/8″ long end to end by 7/16″ wide across the center of the Air Force ID centerpiece. Engraving: “To Kay, With Love, From Jerry 2-14-43” (Valentine’s Day). Maker: Wells Sterling Company. Weight: 9.5gr Quality: Thick, Strong, Sturdy having thick linkage. The links are small yet substantial  so as to hold Art Deco Sweetheart charms. Locking clasp is old, early Art Deco wide hook type clasp. Condition: Excellent Vintage, all around surface scratches that can be polished out. No dents, dings, tears, or damage.

buy cialis 10 mg online Wonderful to find an actual Valentines Day Art Deco 1943 WWII Sterling Silver Air Force Sweetheart Bracelet for anyone who collects antique and vintage sweetheart or military jewelry.

Wells Jewelry:

Wells Inc. Attleboro, Mass. was founded in 1922. They used gold as well as sterling silver to make their jewelry. In 1978,they combined with Benrus and ceased making jewelry.

About Military Sweetheart Jewelry:

Many of the U.S. servicemen who crossed the Atlantic to fight in World War I were teenagers. They had no idea of the horrors awaiting them. The brutal realities of the battlefield made the exchange of letters and keepsakes with loved ones back home vitally important.

These young men initiated the tradition of sending “sweetheart” jewelry back home to their girlfriends, wives, sisters, and mothers. The custom grew more popular during World War II, when U.S. troops were once again fighting far from home. Some sweetheart jewelry was handcrafted in the trenches. However, much of it was machine-made and sold to U.S. soldiers, who then sent it back home.

The women who received this jewelry wore it with pride. It let them feel connected to their loved ones on the other side of the world. Additionally, it also show their patriotism. It was a time when almost all Americans pulled together to contribute to the war effort. Whether that meant working in a factory, selling war bonds, or collecting scrap metal to be melted down.

During World War II, most precious metals were rationed and used only to build weapons, tanks, ships, airplanes, and other machinery needed for the Allies’ campaign. As such, most sweetheart jewelry from this era was made from non-precious or semi-precious materials such as bakelite, celluloid, wood, mother-of-pearl, shell, ivory, rhinestone, enamel, and cheap wire. Yet, ther are more rare pieces, sometimes adorned with diamonds which can be found in platinum, sterling silver, silverplate, brass, gold plate, gold filled, and even solid gold.

For further information see collectors weekly:   http://www.collectorsweekly.com/costume-jewelry/sweetheart